‘Anti-racism campaigns increase bias: study’

Anti-racism campaigns increase bias: study

Message of tolerance proves more effective

By DEREK ABMA, Postmedia News July 9, 2011

Touting the benefits of tolerance, as opposed to trying to shame people for their prejudices, can be more effective in reducing racism, suggests a new study from researchers at the University of Toronto.

Aggressive anti-racism campaigns might actually increase bias toward other groups, while messages emphasizing the personal stake one has in a more open-minded society can be most effective, says the paper, which will appear in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science.

Source.

Or maybe “People don’t like being told what to do,” as opposed to “anti-racism campaigns increase bias.”  I’d be curious to see the demographics of the “non-black” people.

5 thoughts on “‘Anti-racism campaigns increase bias: study’

  1. You might be able to.

    For more information about this study, please contact: Lisa Legault at lisa.legault@utoronto.ca.

    For a copy of the article “Ironic Effects of Anti-Prejudice Messages: How Motivational Interventions Can Reduce (but also increase) Prejudice” and access to other Psychological Science research findings, please contact Divya Menon at 202-293-9300 or dmenon@psychologicalscience.org.

  2. Yeah, it seems more like positive incentives are better than negative incentives, not that anti-racism campaigns are bad. The “Anti-racism campaigns increase bias: study” is quite an illogical leap from what the article is saying; I blame the newspaper editor.

    The non-black people are probably white and Asian (not just East Asian).

  3. Oops, I meant ‘The “Anti-racism campaigns increase bias: study” headline is quite an illogical leap’, and I blame the editor, because as I understand it, the editor writes the headline and the columnist has no control over it.

  4. In the article another similar statement is made:

    Aggressive anti-racism campaigns might actually increase bias toward other groups, while messages emphasizing the personal stake one has in a more open-minded society can be most effective, says the paper, which will appear in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science.

  5. Makes sense. Anti-racism campaigns aggressively illuminate the source of racism in the form of spotlights on privilege. People don’t like that.

    This is not the fault of anti-racism campaigns.

    I suppose the message here is: Be gentle with our privilege. Only speak in positives and do not insinuate that individuals have personal responsibility. Be patient, because our egos are fragile and if you are not gentle enough, we will only discriminate more.

    Whee! Can’t win for losing.

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