Mothers.

Washington University students made a trip to Chicago last week, with a planned and pre-arranged stop at a Division Street bar. The students had negotiated a $25 rate with the bar, but when they got there, the African American students were denied entrance.

Safety concerns, yanno.  The bar manager cited a “no baggy pants” policy.  So one of the students switched pants with one of the white students.  They must be good friends.  Anyway, I’m sure you can guess what happened.

Incidentally, I saw a photograph of these kids in their pants and I’m not even sure they qualify as “baggy.”  But whatever.

8 thoughts on “Mothers.

  1. I’m not surprised… http://www.flickr.com/photos/ben5000/3930569910/ this is a few months old but this sign was at a bar in a neighborhood in brooklyn that I’m going to say is populated by predominantly middle/upper middle class white transplants who think they’re too cool for school. the sign has been removed but I’m sure they still turn people away

  2. Do you mind if I ask where you get all the news stories you post? I subscribe to a lot of different “social justice” type blogs, and I usually see the same news item get posted over and over again. Which isn’t a bad thing, but the stuff that pops up on your blog I rarely see anywhere else. And most of the stories you’re posting are things I am really, really interested in. Where are you getting your news feed?

    You’re totally going to say, “I read the paper,” aren’t you? And then I’ll be like, yes, but where do you get that in blog form.

  3. Come on guys…they’re just trying to lighten up the place.

    I can’t believe that in the face of obvious racism they are still trying to say they aren’t discriminating. They’re Mothers alright.

    @js718: hadn’t seen that sign before but No Timberlands? What the heck? Discrimination against hikers now?

  4. What gets me is how these reports always end up focusing on the POCs reaction to the racism — they can’t just leave it at the racism itself, they’ve got to slip in that justification, even if they don’t come out and say that’s what they’re doing.

    It’s always, oh, the POCs were __________ fill in the blank: frustrated, emotional, belligerent, upset, loud, crowding, angry … whatever. Seriously, it’s like code for “reasonable” (aka white) readers, “hey, under normal circumstances, yeah, this might have been racist, but listen, if you’d have seen how loud/scary/angry these folks were, you’d know we just had the safety and well-being of our other patrons in mind! “

    We just had a story in our local paper about an incident w/ local law enforcement and a Black pastor – same thing. The pastor was loud. He was belligerent with police. He was angry. Unreasonable. Then the comments after the article: he dresses too flashy. The car he drives is flashy. You can tell by looking at him that he must not be walking “that closely with the Lord. No, I’m not kidding.

    Thing is, what you said in another post about white people living in a white bubble – white folks, not really understanding the history behind these incidents, have no idea how it would FEEL to be on the other side of these actions while knowing that it’s not an isolated incident … how yes, you’d feel frustrated, wronged, angry, any of those things. Even the so-called liberal/progressive white folks will read an article shaking their head at the unfairness … until they read that the POC got upset about the RACISM, then all of a sudden it’s, “oh, well, if only they’d have acted right … ”

    Sorry, kind of ranting off the original point, but it seems that happens in every article about a racist incident.

  5. Agreed, more cowbell.

    Harriet Jacobs, I’m a news junkie. Like to read the “ethnic” papers. Don’t use any feed. Read a bunch of blogs, if I saw an article there I link.

  6. @more cowbell — Unapologetic Mexican talks about what you very astutely mentioned. The full entry is here: http://www.theunapologeticmexican.org/glosario.html

    †The Drowning maestro- A Wite-Magik Attak that pretends to be utterly concerned with the brown person’s tone. It matters not that the brown person might be speaking passionately of hurts they have suffered … Because what really bothers them is that a brown person has the nerve to speak with such self-confidence and passion. This, in fact, scares them…
    • UPPITY negro…
    • CONFRONTATIONAL…
    • CHIP ON YOUR SHOULDER…
    NOTE: This Attak often comes with a carrot. In other words, what is really desired is for the brown person to admit the desired hierarchy, to get “back in place.” To achieve this, the power-holding person will often criticize the tone of the desired subjugate while making it clear that a withheld reward might come their way if they submit to the invisible pecking order being violated…

    • “We’d admit about your point if you presented it nicer…”
    • “People would listen to your complaint if you weren’t so loud…”

  7. NOTE: This Attak often comes with a carrot. In other words, what is really desired is for the brown person to admit the desired hierarchy, to get “back in place.” To achieve this, the power-holding person will often criticize the tone of the desired subjugate while making it clear that a withheld reward might come their way if they submit to the invisible pecking order being violated…”

    Another somewhat related tactic is for Whites to promote those minority leaders who adopt a more “concialatory” (i.e. appeasing) tone and agenda while dismissing militant leaders as hardliners.

    The former are fawned over as moderate and reasonable in their demands, while the latter are demonized as extremists.

    One can see this during the 1960s and 1970s where the civil rights movement was favored by Whites over the more radical Black Power movement.

    This is not only a favored White tactic used against minorities, but it is one used by the imperialist West against those developing nations it is occupying, threatening, or attempting to regime change.

    The West’s domestic racial policy is writ large in its imperial foreign policy (particularly against predominantly non-White nations).

  8. And contrast the national sentiment toward the Tea Bag Parties with the one toward demonstrations like the Million Man March and immigration protests. The media portrays the Tea Bag demonstrators as having “real” grievances (even celebrating those who dare carry guns with them) whereas the demonstrations involving people of color are portrayed as faceless mobs with yet another complaint.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s