Less crime, better food

I’m somewhat suspicious of reports that claim Asian Americans “suffer less from violent crime than other racial groups,” since I tend to believe that crimes against Asian Americans are underreported.  But according to this article, that’s the findings from the Justice Department.

In 2006, 360 Asian-Americans were murdered. They were victims of two percent of all US homicides, while accounting for about four percent of the population, the study found.

Sounds a little like the writer thinks we should be catching up.

In addition, the article notes that Asian Americans are more likely than non-Asians to be the victims of strangers.

And just like this article about Jim Yong Kim, I was a little taken aback by the last few paragraphs, which seem to fall under the category of let’s jam everything we might possibly know about Asian Americans into the tail of this story:

Asian Americans tend to have higher education and income than the national average, according to the latest statistical profile by the Asian-American Studies Center at the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA).

The average Asian-American household earns 66,103 dollars a year, against a national average of 50,233, it said. But there were major differences within the community, with Americans of Indian origin the wealthiest.

8 thoughts on “Less crime, better food

  1. The average Asian-American household earns 66,103 dollars a year, against a national average of 50,233, it said. But there were major differences within the community, with Americans of Indian origin the wealthiest.

    Ugh, there’s that pernicious “household” instead of “individual” income thing again.

  2. I think the crimes against Asian Americans are either underreported, ignored or not taken seriously. Also, the income statement does not make a valid comparison in relationship to education level and number of hours worked, or the number of people working in a household in comparison to whites households.

  3. I don’t know where I initially learned the household confound–I’ve encountered it in so many refutations of the Model Minority Myth that it’s like common sense to me now. But if I had to guess, I’d say Ronald Takaki, probably Strangers from a Different Shore.

  4. Coolness. I wonder if we can teach basic statistics concepts to high school students so that they can think critically about any statistic. If as many people are educated about this as they are about the earth revolving around the sun, so many popular oppressive myths and views could be eliminated from our culture.

    “Restructure and “resistance” share the same first three letters, but the they have different character lengths.

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